St. Mawes Castle

St. Mawes Castle

St. Mawes Castle safeguards the eastern entryway to the estuary understood as Carrick Roads. In each a squat round tower is the primary function, however rather of having a square property block slapped on in front of it, the St. Mawes tower is elaborated by 3 connected semi-circular bastions with parapets at a lower level.

St. Mawes is unlike Pendennis however like the bulk of Henry VIII’s forts in being low lying and hence able to challenge opponent shipping at close quarters. Both castles share Henry’s other strongholds, the rounded merlons developed to deflect cannon balls, the big embrasures for weapons at a number of levels, and the emplacements for drawbridge and portcullis, the latter revealing that the forts were planned to use some resistance at close quarters if the opponent ever landed.

In terms of size, the castles would appear to have actually been developed as equates to and their early guvs were bitter competitors. With the Elizabethan augmentation of Pndennis, nevertheless, St. Mawes diminished into a subsidiary function. In contrast with Pendennis Castle’s brave position, the royalist guv here carefully evaluated the castle to be indefensible from the land and gave up without a shot being fired.

St. Mawes Castle protects the eastern entryway to the estuary understood as Carrick Roads. Both castles share Henry’s other strongholds, the rounded merlons created to deflect cannon balls, the big embrasures for weapons at a number of levels, and the emplacements for drawbridge and portcullis, the latter revealing that the forts were meant to use some resistance at close quarters if the opponent ever landed. In contrast with Pendennis Castle’s brave position, the royalist guv here carefully evaluated the castle to be indefensible from the land and gave up without a shot being fired.