Arbors in English Tudor Gardens

Arbors in English Tudor Gardens

Every Tudor garden included one or more arbors. One type had a square-topped roofing system, while the other type was arched.

More strong buildings of brick or of stone worked in winter season along with summer season, as they were provided with chimneys. Such a one, on a big scale, is still to be seen at Hampton Court, and is called the banqueting home. Another, which has actually now vanished, was constructed for Elizabeth of York at Windsor.

Long covered strolls formed another essential function in every garden. Often they passed in between lines of clipped trees bent to form an arch, like the hornbeam walk at Hatfield, or the one of witch elm, called Queen Mary’s, at Hampton Court. One of the benefits of these strolls was that under their shade it was possible to go from one part of the garden to another without being exposed to the sun.

Another function established at this duration was the install, a mound of earth generally covered with turf and serving as a lookout over the garden wall into the park. It was developed on a brick structure covered with earth and planted with twelve hundred quicksets.

Every Tudor garden consisted of one or more arbors. Often they passed in between lines of clipped trees bent to form an arch, like the hornbeam walk at Hatfield, or the one of witch elm, called Queen Mary’s, at Hampton Court. One of the benefits of these strolls was that under their shade it was possible to go from one part of the garden to another without being exposed to the sun. Another function established at this duration was the install, a mound of earth typically covered with yard and serving as a lookout over the garden wall into the park.